Category: Super Iron Out

FEB
18

How to Clean Your Shower Head

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Think about the last time you took a shower. How did the showerhead perform? When you first installed your showerhead, you likely got great pressure and the water flowed in the correct direction. However, over time, mineral deposits can build up in the showerhead and the water may start squirting in all directions or even clog up completely. When this happens, you have poor water pressure or low flow and will not feel as clean as you would like. Luckily, you do not necessarily have to replace it; there are a few ways you can return the flow to your showerhead and help make certain your family can enjoy a nice, relaxing shower.

Remove lime deposits from shower head

Massage It – If you have a showerhead with “rubber nubs” on the front of it, you may be able to clean these and remove the mineral deposits by simply rubbing them. Massage these rubber nubs and loosen the deposits””giving your nozzle its pressure back.

Soak It – Choose a quality product for removing minerals (often a rust stain removal product will work well) and soak your showerhead in this. Have a little patience and after the soaking in one of these rust removers, rinse the showerhead well. This can be the ideal solution for the most problems.

Clean the Filter Screen – If all else fails, you may need to take the showerhead apart. Some showerheads have a filter screen inside that will collect minerals over time. Follow your user manual and take the showerhead apart. Then you can brush the filter screen off or soak it in the same rust removal product and then rinse it clean. Just make certain you hold on to all the parts of the showerhead, otherwise you will not be able to get things back together as they should be.

Even the most difficult of these tasks are not that complicated. You just need to put in a little effort and you can return your showerhead to its like new condition. It is well worth the work you put into it. After all, there is nothing more relaxing and refreshing than a shower when the shower has adequate pressure and flow!


JAN
15

What is Hard Water?

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Hard water can be a big nuisance. Beyond this, the effects of this water can cause the breakdown of appliances, cause you to struggle with rust stains on clothing and around the house and even add to your energy costs. The term hard water is often mentioned by those suffering from these problems, but what do you know about this type of water?

What is Hard Water?

Hard water is higher in dissolved minerals than baseline or soft water. Typically the minerals that are found in higher quantities are calcium and magnesium. Luckily, there are no major health risks associated with hot water, but it can build up in your pipes, decrease effectiveness of soaps and detergents and even dry the skin. Plus, you will likely have to look into rust removal around the house to reduce the stains caused by hard water.

Identifying Hard Water

It is easy to recognize a hard water problem. An abundance of soap scum and mineral deposits on glasses are often the first signs. Additionally, if you find your clothes do not get clean and your skin is dryer than it should be, you may have a hard water problem. The only way to identify hard water for sure is to have it tested. Doing this will help you determine if you need to make a change to how your water is processed.


Solutions?

The most common way to deal with a hard water problem is to install a water softener. By doing this, the water is soften before it enters your interior pipeline. Softer water will cause fewer rust problems and reduce the long-term impact on your pipes and appliances around the house.

If you are facing some of the problems mentioned above, it may be time to find out if you have hard water. After all, while there are some costs and struggles involved with softening your water, these are very minor when compared with replacing all your appliances or your pipes--plus constantly purchasing rust removal products to get rid of those stains. Make an effort to get the problem under control today and you’ll be able to enjoy the benefits of well-balanced water for years to come.


NOV
5

Getting Bathtubs White Again

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A clean, inviting bathroom is one of life’s little luxuries. After all, you’re much more likely to use that big soaking tub or spa shower if you can do so in a clean, relaxing environment. While keeping the floor mopped, toilet scrubbed and trash emptied is straightforward enough, there is one problem you may not know how to tackle””a grubby bathtub. If you want to make that tub bright white again, keep these tips in mind. Removing rust in your bathtub

  • Is it Dirt, Scum or Rust? – Before you start wiping away at the stains and discoloration, it is important that you identify exactly what the problem is. Dirt will generally wipe away with just a soft cloth and water, soap scum may require the need of a heavy duty chemical, but should wipe away easily, but rust removal is hard, especially rust stains in the bathtub””unless you use a specialty rust stain removal product like Super Iron Out.
  • Start Small – You do not have to clean the whole tub at one time. Breaking it into individual tasks can make it seem more manageable.
  • Take it Easy – You may not always have to use a scouring brush to get a tub clean. Use the lightest, softest cleaning tool you can get away with. It will protect your finish.
  • Rinse Well – No matter what type of product you’re using to clean your tub, take time to rinse the surface really well when you are done. Built on cleaner residue can cause soap scum, plus it is not very inviting to take a bath in a tub that still has chemicals from the last cleaning job.
  • Remember the Details – When cleaning your tub, it is easy to remove rust, scrub the scum and make the tub nice and shiny while forgetting things like the faucets and hardware. If you do this, you’ll never have that upscale, inviting look you desire.

Once you have your tub looking bright white again, you are well on your way to that spa-like oasis you have always dreamed your bathroom could be. Just remember, put in a little effort to keep your tub clean and you will not have to go through the annoying, difficult cleaning process again.

OCT
14

How to Remove Scary Rust Stains in the Sink

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One of the worst ways to start your day is staring at a dirty, unpleasant rust stain in the sink while you are brushing your teeth. Those pesky rust stains do not just wipe away, and the longer you let them sit, the worse they get. However, it is possible to get rid of them””if you know how to get rid of rust, the right way.

  • Don’t Keep Doing the Same Old Thing – You’ve tried bathroom cleaners, home remedies and other products over and over. They may reduce the stains, but they do not completely remove the rust. Luckily, trying a new product may help. Super Iron Out is not the same old cleaner. It is designed for one purpose””to remove rust from the surface. Rust in sink
  • Tools Matter – While you may be able to get some results by just using an old towel or cloth, a good scrub brush or scouring pad can help. Just make sure you choose a tool that will not harm the surface of your sink. You should be able to find this out by reading the owner’s manual.
  • Apply Elbow Grease – Using Super Iron Out is easy, simply wet the area that needs to be cleaned. Apply the powder to damp sponge or cloth and rub lightly until stains are gone. Don't forget to rinse after the stains have been removed. Save your elbow and use Super Iron Out.
  • Stay at It – Rust removal is not a one-time job. You will need to stick with it. Remove the rust in your sink today and check again next week. Chances are the stains will reappear. Do not give up, just stick with it and see what you can do to reduce the chances it will come back (like fixing that annoying leak!). Use Super Iron Out as needed when stains reappear.

Once you understand how to remove rust stains, you will find that it is well worth your effort to get rid of them. Just remember, as the old saying goes: “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Once you have a nice, clean, rust-free sink, keep it that way. By taking proactive measures, you can avoid the buildup of rust that will cause you frustration as well as hard work.


OCT
3

Testimonial: Jane L.

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We had a high priced well water treatment system, which became too costly to maintain and iron was still present anyway causing rust stains so, we disconnected the system. We now have a major iron problem---red basins, orange tubs & sinks, dirty looking dishes, etc. We tried using a lot of elbow grease with various cleaning products which claim to remove rust stains---none worked to our satisfaction, not even close.

I saw the powder form of Super Iron Out Rust Stain Remover in the grocery store and decided to give it a try. I followed the directions in cleaning one of our toilets. It didn't work as well as I had hoped, but I used it in our second bathroom. I decided to let it set a little longer. In doing so, I fell asleep. A few hours later, when I awoke, the toilet and tank were clean and I didn't have to do any scrubbing. AMAZING! I now use the powder form of Super Iron Out for any large jobs and the easy liquid spray form for any touch-up jobs.

I have been looking for the Super Iron Out Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner tablets WITHOUT SUCCESS. I can't wait to try them too!
by: Jane L

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Image Supplied by; Summit Brands
SEP
26

Testimonial by: Linda C.

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Started to get rust stains in the shower and toilets, about six months ago. I tried everything and nothing worked to clean them.


I did some further research on the internet and your product Super Iron Out came up.

Went to Lowes and purchased the spray, came home and sprayed in toilets and tanks and the rust stains just melted away. I couldn't be more happier. I've cleaned the shower with it as well.

I picked up the powder and put it in the water softener, it clean the rust right out of the in-coming water.

So many uses for the powder... I have also put it in the dishwasher and washing machine to remove rust stains.

Great product, thank you.


by: Linda C.


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Picture Provided by: Summit Brands

SEP
24

Testimonial by: Debbie S.

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I have fought hard water and rust stains forever. I have spent tons of money on products that just would not work. The only thing that would work was a product in which you needed to open doors, windows, and turn on the exhaust fan and scrub, scrub, scrub. I bought Super Iron Out Spray, sprayed it on the tub and within minutes the stains disappeared. You have a life time customer for and thank you for making a product that works and makes my life easier. I cannot say enough good things about this product. I am very impressed and so very grateful to say the least. by: Debbie Spearman

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SEP
16

Get Rid of Rust Stains on Your Siding

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Your home’s siding is one of the first things anyone will notice about the exterior. Whether you have standard, vinyl or another form of siding, it is a constant battle to keep it clean and looking its best. Clean, fresh siding adds instant curb appeal and dirty, dingy siding makes the whole house appear outdated and unpleasant. One problem nearly every homeowner faces from time to time is rust staining on the siding. Luckily, learning how to remove rust from your siding is easier than you may think.

The Right Tool Matters – Make sure you are using the right type of tool for your particular type of siding. Vinyl siding is usually the easiest to clean and you can normally clean it with just a soft cloth, sponge or cloth. A wooden siding may need something a little more durable.

Remove Rust from Siding

Choosing a Cleaner – Rust is not as easy to remove as, for instance, dirt. As such, you need to choose the right cleaner. Make sure you read up on your particular siding material and make sure that you choose a chemical that will not harm it. A dedicated rust remover like Super Iron Out is a great choice. Using this is sure to provide you with a great result.

Under Pressure – Pressure washing is another way you can go about removing rust from siding. However, you do have to be careful because too heavy of a pressure or doing it too often can cause damage, especially to older painted or cedar plank siding.

As you can see, there are plenty options for ridding your home of unsightly and damaging rust. No matter how you decide to go about the rust stain removal process, the most important thing is to choose a product that will get the job done without risking damage to your siding. The best rust removers will offer plenty of information so you can make certain the product is safe for use on your siding. After all, the last thing you want to do is risk the integrity of the siding itself in the quest to get it clean!


SEP
5

Testimonial by: Colleen V.

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You have a wonderful product in Super Iron Out, I don't know what your product is made of, but it instantly dissolved the rust stains in both of our toilet bowls caused from a continuous water leak. One rust stain was quite bad, as we had gone away on vacation for 2.5 weeks!!! It worked much better than CLR as you don't have to do any scrubbing to remove the stain, just pour the powder and on, it seems to magically cling to the side of the toilet bowl and erase the stain. So glad I found out about Super Iron Out, which I found by doing an internet search on how to remove rust stains from toilet bowls. I think I saw it on eHow.
by: Colleen Votour
JUL
21

Testimonial: by: Debbie Spearman

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I have fought hard water stains & rust stains forever. I have spent tons of money on products that just would not work. The only thing that would work was a product that you had to open doors, windows, and turn on the exhaust fan and scrub, scrub, scrub. I bought the Super Iron Out Spray, sprayed it on the rust stained tub and within minutes the stains started to disappear. You have a life time customer and thank you for making a product that works and makes my life easier. I cannot say enough good things about this product. I am very impressed and so very grateful to say the least.
by: Debbie Spearman